Health-Chair Reform Your Chair: Comfortable but Deadly

Date: 
11-01-2010

In the 1 h before work, a person can use more than 50 labor devices. At work, between logging-on to logging-off, a person can remain nearly continuously in their chair. At the end of the work-day, if the home is the castle, the chair is its throne. From their throne, a person can order food, purchase a car, find a new life-partner, and play war; all this—and more—without ever getting up. With creativity, a person can eat, work, reproduce, play, shop, and sleep without taking a step.

The articles in this issue of Diabetes by Højbjerre et al. (The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control1), Katzmarzyk (The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control2), and Franks (The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control3), plus a growing body of evidence suggest that chair-living is lethal. Of concern is that for most people in the developed world, chair-living is the norm.

The consequences of modern chair-dependency are substantial. The data summarized by Katzmarzyk suggest that chair-dependency is linked to cardiovascular disease, metabolic sequelae, excess weight, and shorter life span. Other authorities stress deleterious psychological and psychosocial effects as well (The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control4,The following popper user interface control may not be accessible. Tab to the next button to revert the control to an accessible version.Destroy user interface control5).

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Authors: 
James A. Levine